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One Year On | Innovative heating a success for Notre Dame Primary School

Posted by on in Heat 2015
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Last year, the innovative combined heat and power and ground source heat pump system installed at Notre Dame Primary School was celebrated at the ADE's annual awards dinner.  One year on, we spoke to Bob McNair from Glasgow City Council to find out more about how this innovative system has benefitted the school's community.

In 2013, Notre Dame Primary School and Ellie Nursery installed five mini combined heat and power (CHP) units, to work in tandem with a ground source heat pump (GSHP) and thermal storage. This past year, the ground source heat pumps were at 50% of the heating and hot water capacity, with the CHPs running for around 4500 hours.

Having a flexible system and using complimentary technologies have been and will be a real benefit to the school in the years to come.

"Over the last two years occupancy hours have increased by over 50%, and the CHP system has been able to facilitate these changes with ease....With small scale CHP there is no need to modulate the engine output, the system runs in response to the heating controls without any issues."

The ability of the CHPs and the GSHPs to work in tandem was critical to the success of the installation.

"Last winter all five CHP units were readjusted to run continuously up to 23hours per day to ensure a consistent supply of heat and hot water. Now that RHI metering is in place, the school can reduce the heat input from the CHPs by 40% and in turn increase the use of the GSHP. This small change in how the heat and hot water is produced means the school will benefit more from the Renewable Heat Incentive without changing the level of comfort."

Generating its own heat and power gives the school a certain level of future proofing against rising gas and electricity prices.


"When gas prices increase, in the years to come, this school need not rely on the “standby” gas fuelled boilers installed in the school. It can generate is own heat and electrical power without using either boilers or GSHPs.  Conversely, when the renewable level of electricity production reaches a peak, the GSHPs can contribute more heat and hot water than the CHPs."  

Carbon emissions are also an important metric for the school.

"Despite the change in occupancy hours the carbon emissions from the school have been below that of other well managed schools in Glasgow. With the changes made for next year the CO2 levels at Notre Dame Primary School and Ellie Nursery will be far lower.”

Finally, the school community love the new refurbished old school and new 5 storey extension and are proud of the low carbon system!

"The kids and parents love the school with its renewable system. The school is Victorian and even has the same cast iron radiators, albeit refurbished, that their great, great, great grandparents saw in 1894."

 

Comments

  • Guest
    Bob McNair Friday, 11 September 2015

    Just one slight error - the GSHPs contributed 50% of the GSHP capacity and not 50% of the heat required for the building as mentioned

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Guest
Guest Friday, 15 December 2017

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